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ProLinks #41 - Do we need standups?, why to keep a changelog, how to make friends and more

IT


You don’t need standup - Up until January I was a developer who was upset at how many meetings I had. 

Repeat yourself, do more than one thing, and rewrite everything - Following “Don’t Repeat Yourself” might lead you to a function with four boolean flags, and a matrix of behaviours to carefully navigate when changing the code.

Face Anti-spoofing, Face Presentation Attack Detection - We proposes a novel two-stream CNN-based face antispoofing method, for print and replay attacks. The proposed method extracts the local features and holistic depth maps from face images.

Bandit Algorithms Book - The book includes around 250 exercises, some of which have solutions.

How I Built my Side Project and Got 31,000 Users the First Week - The first thing I do when I start working on a new product is to define an MVP.

EUD Security Guidance: Ubuntu 18.04 LTS - This guidance was developed following testing on devices running Ubuntu 18.04 LTS.

Keep a Changelog - Don’t let your friends dump git logs into changelogs.

Translating Accessibility Research into Accessibility Practice - This presentation will present a number of potential approaches for increasing the accessibility of real-world systems and digital content.

Tech Stacks -  The open source tools and SaaS behind the world's best startups 

GUIs Considered Harmful - I am increasingly troubled by how many new applications are designed to work solely under a GUI.

Kolmogorov Complexity and Our Search for Meaning - What math can teach us about finding order in our chaotic lives. 

A computer will (probably) eradicate humanity - But it won’t be artificially intelligent

Mozilla's new DNS resolution is dangerous - All your DNS traffic will be sent to Cloudflare

Life


How to Make Friends, According to Science - To begin, don’t dismiss the humble acquaintance.

How Do Adults Make Friends? - None of these problems are new, but it just gets harder to believe that strangers are worth investing time in as you get older.

The most relaxing vacation you can take is going nowhere at all - Vacation is exhausting when you go places. It’s often a time of awkward experiences—donning bathing suits, struggling with foreign tongues, trying to have fun where you know no one and none of the customs. 

Society


James Gunn and the Culture of Internet Outrage - Jim discusses director James Gunn’s removal from the “Guardians of the Galaxy” franchise and suggests an alternative target for our collective moral outrage.

The Undeniable Pain of Getting Drunk - Alcohol! One of our oldest and most polarizing past times. We've brewed it, bottled it, banned it, and barfed it. But for as long as we've been farming, it has been a part of our society.

Economics


The Postal Illuminati - Is there a secretive postal organization fixing international shipping rates, and giving American businesses a bad deal? 

Parenting


Motherhood in the Age of Fear - Women are being harassed and even arrested for making perfectly rational parenting decisions.

Politics


The Times finally gets to the bottom of Trump supporters: It turns out they're garbage human beings -  It is meant to be flattering, or at least neutral, but the short version is that the people who have been bleating about "family values" for the last half-century do not actually give a flying damn about family values and never did. It was all garbage from the get-go.

Trump’s not the problem. He’s a symbol of 4 bigger issues - If the problem were Trump it wouldn’t be happening in other places around the world.

How the Slovak Interior Minister parked the airplane for Vietnamese abductors - This is the story of the kidnapping of a Vietnamese citizen from Slovakia, as it was recounted to us by local police officers: “They told us he was drunk and had fallen off the stairs.”

The Party of Putin - In his editorial New Rule, Bill asks how Russia has managed to flip not just Trump, but the entire GOP. 

Science


The Uninhabitable Earth - Famine, economic collapse, a sun that cooks us: What climate change could wreak — sooner than you think.

Miscellaneous


Why the city is hotter than the suburb - NPR used video from a thermographic camera to explain why cities tend to be hotter than their surrounding areas.

The Bad Show - With all of the black-and-white moralizing in our world today, we decided to bring back an old show about the little bit of bad that's in all of us...and the little bit of really, really bad that's in some of us.



Carlos Kaiser: A tale from each club that football’s greatest player (who never kicked a ball) visited - Fraud is a label that is frequently thrown around in football. Yet few deserve it quite like Carlos Kaiser, a star of the game that spent 26-years with some of the biggest clubs in Brazil, with stops in Europe and North America along the way.

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