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ProLinks #30

IT


How to write commit messages - A good commit message is one that your team agrees that is good.

Google’s Dangerous Identity Crisis - Is Barack Obama planning a coup? There are many ways to answer that question — “Why are you asking this question?” “What on earth would make you think that?” and, most simply and most accurately, “No.”

Alexa and Siri Can Hear This Hidden Command. You Can’t. - Researchers can now send secret audio instructions undetectable to the human ear to Apple’s Siri, Amazon’s Alexa and Google’s Assistant.

Society


The Intellectual We Deserve - Jordan Peterson’s popularity is the sign of a deeply impoverished political and intellectual landscape…

Source: Wikimedia


Why Winners Keep Winning - On Cumulative Advantage and How to Think About Luck

Politics


The fascist philosopher behind Vladimir Putin’s information warfare - Yale University Professor Timothy Snyder gives a crash course in Ivan Ilyin's philosophy of fascism and explains why this worldview is so appealing to Putin 

History


Medieval trade networks v.4 - The map also depicts the general topography, rivers, mountain passes and named routes. All of which contributed to why cities came to be, and still are, up until modern times.

Media


How the American Media Fuels A Cycle of Violence -  Needed to get this off my chest.

Miscellaneous


Seven Maps to Better Understand the World - In which John discusses some of the maps he uses to try to understand the big stories of contemporary human life on Earth.

Calling Bullshit: Data Reasoning in a Digital World - We will be astonished if these skills do not turn out to be among the most useful and most broadly applicable of those that you acquire during the course of your college education.

I Have No Taste -  Sometimes knowledge isn't all it's cracked up to be.

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